Show Navigation

C

Those who wander have probably been lost at some point.
theatlantic:

What’s Wrong with Sentimentality?

What does it mean to be a tourist inside someone else’s suffering? Sometimes, it means taking a bus ride through Los Angeles’s gang-ridden neighborhoods, or watching a former addict bleed and sweat and grow blisters as he tries to run a hundred miles, or visiting a man in jail.
Leslie Jamison has done all that, and more.
But how does another person’s suffering affect one’s own emotional intelligence? What are you supposed to do with someone else’s pain?
Jamison does not know the answer. But she searches for it by writing about episodes of attempted empathy in her own life—for example, the time she became “obsessed” with her brother’s bout of Bell’s palsy: “I spent large portions of each day imagining how I would feel if my face was paralyzed too. I stole my brother’s trauma and projected it onto myself like a magic-lantern pattern of light.” Was that empathy, Jamison wonders, or was it a kind of emotional theft?
Read more. [Image: Colleen Kinder]

theatlantic:

What’s Wrong with Sentimentality?

What does it mean to be a tourist inside someone else’s suffering? Sometimes, it means taking a bus ride through Los Angeles’s gang-ridden neighborhoods, or watching a former addict bleed and sweat and grow blisters as he tries to run a hundred miles, or visiting a man in jail.

Leslie Jamison has done all that, and more.

But how does another person’s suffering affect one’s own emotional intelligence? What are you supposed to do with someone else’s pain?

Jamison does not know the answer. But she searches for it by writing about episodes of attempted empathy in her own life—for example, the time she became “obsessed” with her brother’s bout of Bell’s palsy: “I spent large portions of each day imagining how I would feel if my face was paralyzed too. I stole my brother’s trauma and projected it onto myself like a magic-lantern pattern of light.” Was that empathy, Jamison wonders, or was it a kind of emotional theft?

Read more. [Image: Colleen Kinder]

whitepaperquotes:

John Green, Paper Towns

whitepaperquotes:

John Green, Paper Towns

outofreception:

Indian Beach, Oregon

outofreception:

Indian Beach, Oregon

(via polerstuff)

patagonia:

“Some of the most beautiful places in Iceland, Mývatn Lake, the Þjórsá River, and the Highlands, are in danger after the Icelandic government recently announced plans to revoke 30-year-old environmental protections so that new hydropower plants can be built.  My brother and I recently hiked 115 miles across Iceland — to the Lake of Eternal Life — to visit these places and make a short film showcasing their natural beauty. ” Check out more from brothers Hank and Brian Leukart at withoutbaggage.com.

patagonia:

Some of the most beautiful places in Iceland, Mývatn Lake, the Þjórsá River, and the Highlands, are in danger after the Icelandic government recently announced plans to revoke 30-year-old environmental protections so that new hydropower plants can be built.  My brother and I recently hiked 115 miles across Iceland — to the Lake of Eternal Life — to visit these places and make a short film showcasing their natural beauty. ” Check out more from brothers Hank and Brian Leukart at withoutbaggage.com.

How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live.

Henry David Thoreau (via thatlitsite)

Due allowance being made for the sounds of the language, writing aloud is not phonological but phonetic; its aim is not the clarity of messages, the theater of emotions; what it searches for (in a perspective of bliss) are the pulsional incidents, the language lined with flesh, a text where we can hear the grain of the throat, the patina of consonants, the voluptuousness of vowels, a whole carnal stereophony: the articulation of the body, of the tongue, not that of meaning, of language. A certain art of singing can give an idea of this vocal writing; but since melody is dead, we may find it more easily today at the cinema. In fact, it suffices that the cinema capture the sound of speech close up (this is, in fact, the generalized definition of the “grain” of writing) and make us hear in their materiality, their sensuality, the breath, the gutturals, the fleshiness of the lips, a whole presence of the human muzzle (that the voice, that writing, be as fresh, supple, lubricated, delicately granular and vibrant as an animal’s muzzle), to succeed in shifting the signified a great distance and in throwing, so to speak, the anonymous body of the actor into my ear: it granulates, it crackles, it caresses, it grates, it cuts, it comes: that is bliss.

The Pleasure of the Text, Roland Barthes (via man-of-prose)

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

darkryemag:

Genius, brilliant, sweet, true. Working up the nerve to sing despite that shy kid who lives in your head.

vimeo:

I Am Tom Moody by Ainslie Henderson

Now you can watch the BAFTA nominated short animation, “I Am Tom Moody” on Vimeo!

(Source: takjestemtu, via mmmbesi)

The woman who doesn’t need validation from anyone is the most feared individual on the planet.

Mohadesa Najumi  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: nyu-tah, via thatkindofwoman)

Taxes suck

goddamn. 

Listen—are you breathing just a little, and calling it a life?

Mary Oliver  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: thresca, via thatkindofwoman)

sickpage:

Pablo ObscuraFog 3, 2013

sickpage:

Pablo Obscura
Fog 3, 2013

(via jotatsu)